Convincing Tips for Hardworking Women Who Want a Raise 💰 ...

Trying to find the right ways to ask for a raise may feel like pulling teeth, but it doesn't have to. With the right attitude and approach, you can ask your boss for the raise you deserve. If you're patient and respectful, most will gladly give you at least a small bump in pay. If you're ready to get paid better, try one of these ways to ask for a raise.

1. Showcase Your Accomplishments

One of the best ways to ask for a raise is to showcase your accomplishments when you ask. A past job of mine required employees to keep track of everything they did throughout the year that helped boost business. Those accomplishments were the basis for raises. Make a detailed list of the value you've provided the company. Bosses love details and it's a great way to show you deserve more.

2. Provide Salary Statistics

Do a little research on what your job title typically earns. If you fall way below the average, print out the statistics to show your boss. Remember, smaller businesses won't be able to pay on the higher end of the earning scale, but they should at least exceed the minimum pay for your title. PayScale.com and Salary.com are great places to start. Sometimes, you're paid less simply because your boss doesn't know what they should pay you.

3. Ask before Your Review

The right time to ask for a raise is several months before your annual review. When you go in for your review, your raise amount, if any, has already been decided. Bosses decide how to divide their allocated budget among their employees before you're ever asked to come in for your review. Schedule a time to talk to your boss beforehand so they can take your request into consideration.

4. List Any New Responsibilities

The days of a single responsibility are long gone. Most employees take on several job roles to help businesses save money. If you've recently taken on new responsibilities or a new role, ask for a bump in pay. Explain how much the company is saving by boosting your pay versus hiring an extra employee. The cost savings alone is enough to persuade most.

5. Mention Other Offers

Most employers know you're likely looking at other job offers at any given point. If you're a valuable employee, they won't want to lose you. Apply to other jobs in your industry and see what offers you receive. Talk to your boss about what competing businesses are offering. They'll either boost your pay to match or if not, take advantage of the higher offer and a new job.

6. Ask for Small Bumps

If you want your boss to respect you, don't go in and ask for a major pay increase. They'll likely just laugh and ignore you. Instead, remember the company has a budget just like you do. Ask for a small increases of no more than 10%. You're more likely to get a few small bumps a year than one major increase.

7. Ask for a Promotion

For this one to work, you should have worked in your current position for at least six months to a year. This gives your employer time to notice how good you truly are at your job. Instead of simply asking for a raise, ask for a promotion. Promotions may include new responsibilities, but also a raise. It shows initiative and puts you in line for future promotions.

No matter what method you use, be respectful and confident. Don't beat around the bush or be rude. When you talk to your boss, know exactly what you're worth and your boss will stand up and take notice. What ways have you tried in the past to get a raise?