8 Things Used as Money in the past ...

Jordin

8 Things Used as Money in the past ...
8 Things Used as Money in the past ...

The many different things used as money in the past may not seem so important now, but you have to admit that it’s cool knowing that people used to accept what we might consider strange items as currency! Knowing about our history can really give us insight into the way people used to live, and how quickly things have changed. I’ve made this neat list of things used as money in the past for you to see how things we take for granted today, were once highly valued and necessary to everyday life, much like money is now. Please, continue reading for my list of things used as money in the past.

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1

Buckskins

Buckskins were one of the popular things used as money from days gone by. Buckskins were considered valuable because people used them to make blankets, rugs, tarps, and even clothes or water skins! This method of currency would have been most popular during the time settlers were just coming to America.

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Buckskins were an important form of currency used in the days before money was widely accepted. They were made from the hides of deer, elk, and buffalo, and were used by Native Americans and settlers alike. Buckskins were used for a variety of purposes, such as blankets, rugs, tarps, clothing, and even water skins. They were highly valued for their practicality and durability.

Buckskins could be traded for goods and services, and were one of the earliest forms of bartering. They were also used as a form of currency in the early days of the American colonies. Buckskins were so widely used that they were accepted as payment for taxes in some areas.

Buckskins were eventually replaced by coins and paper money, but they still hold a place in history as one of the earliest forms of currency used in the United States. They are still used today by some Native American tribes, and are a popular collector’s item. Buckskins are a reminder of the days when money was not as widely accepted, and of the importance of bartering and trading goods and services.

2

Mirrors

I was surprised to learn that mirrors were one of the things used as money in the past! Apparently mirrors were valuable because they were rare and quite expensive. Many families did not even own one or, if they did, it was very small. I couldn’t imagine that, since I have large mirrors in nearly every room of my home now!

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In the past, mirrors had a variety of uses, from reflecting sunlight to helping people see their reflection. They were also used as currency in many cultures, including Ancient China and Ancient Rome. In China, mirrors were made of bronze and were used as a form of currency, while in Rome, silver and gold mirrors were used as a form of payment.

In many cultures, mirrors were a symbol of wealth and status, and owning a mirror was considered a sign of prestige. As a result, mirrors were often exchanged as a form of currency, as well as being used to purchase goods and services.

The use of mirrors as a form of currency was not limited to ancient times. In some parts of the world, mirrors were also used as a form of payment in the 19th century. In some parts of Africa, mirrors were exchanged for goods and services, and were also used as a form of currency.

Mirrors have also been used in spiritual and religious ceremonies, as a symbol of protection and good fortune. In some cultures, mirrors were believed to ward off evil spirits and bring good luck.

3

Shells

Shells seem to be an odd thing used as money in the past, but there is logic behind it. Shells were used to make jewelry and hair adornments among other things, and so obviously they could have been used as trade for something. And of course, years ago, people didn’t get to visit the ocean often, if at all, because travel was so expensive and time consuming. So to most individuals, a shell was something unique and extraordinary!

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Shells have been used as a form of currency for centuries, especially in coastal regions. In the past, shells were a valuable commodity because they could be used for a variety of purposes, from making jewelry and hair adornments to being used as a form of currency. Shells were also a form of currency because of their rarity and the difficulty of obtaining them. For many people, shells were a sign of wealth and status.

In addition to their practical uses, shells were also valued for their aesthetic value. Many cultures used shells to make decorative items such as masks, jewelry, and other art objects. Shells were also used to decorate clothing, and were often used as a form of currency in trade.

Shells were also used as a form of currency in many parts of the world, including parts of Africa, Asia, and the Americas. In some cultures, shells were even used as a form of payment for taxes or other services.

Shells were also used as a form of currency in ancient times. In fact, shells were used as a form of currency in the ancient Roman Empire. The Roman Empire used shells as a form of currency in trade, and the currency was accepted throughout the empire.

4

Tobacco

It’s probably quite obvious why tobacco would have been one of the things used as money in the past! Besides being smoked for enjoyment, people considered tobacco to have medicinal powers. And tobacco was sold in larger quantities years ago, so you could receive a whole pouch or bagful in on a single trade!

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Tobacco has been used as a form of currency for centuries, and it was especially popular in the American colonies. In fact, tobacco was so valuable that it was even used to pay taxes in some places. People believed in the medicinal powers of tobacco, and it was also used for spiritual ceremonies.

Tobacco was sold in large quantities, and it was often traded for goods and services. This made it a perfect form of currency, as it was easy to store and transport. It was also easy to divide into smaller amounts, so it could be used to purchase small items.

Tobacco was not just used as a form of currency in the American colonies. It was also used in other parts of the world, such as Africa and South America. In some cultures, it was even used as a form of currency for slaves. This was because tobacco was so valuable that it was seen as a form of wealth.

Tobacco was not only used as a form of currency, but it was also used to make items such as clothing and tools. It was also used to make paper, and it was even used as a form of fertilizer.

5

Salt

Could you imagine being limited in the amount of salt you could have? Salt was often rationed out in years past because we did not have ready access to it like we do nowadays. In general, food does not taste as good without salt, so it makes sense why people would use or accept salt as currency in the past. Salt is another item that people would often use as a medicine as well, so that added to the value.

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Throughout history, salt has held immense worth, to the point where soldiers in ancient Rome were sometimes paid in salt rather than money—a practice that gave rise to the word "salary." In fact, the phrase "worth ones salt" indicates someone's competence by referring to their value in salt, a clear testament to the mineral's role in trade and economy. The scarcity and labor-intensiveness of salt extraction meant that having it signified wealth and status, further reinforcing its standing as a sought-after commodity and a staple in transactions across various cultures.

6

Animals

Animals were a primary source of food many years ago, and people heavily depended on them. Not only did they provide food through themselves such as eggs, milk, and butter, but they also helped to plow the land and harvest the crops. And of course, they could be slaughtered and eaten! It’s no surprise that people would accept a fat cow or strong horse on trade as money.

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In the tapestry of historical trade, livestock was akin to walking bank accounts. A healthy flock represented wealth that could be bartered directly for goods or services. In certain cultures, the value of an animal was measured by its utility or breeding capabilities, thus a prize ram or a prolific hen could command a high price. Animal trades were not only practical but also reflected the status and wealth of a family. They could easily be parlayed into marriage dowries or used to settle debts, embedding them deeply into the social and economic fabric of the times.

7

Barley

I was shocked to discover that barley is one of the things used as money in the past. I suppose flour is one of the things we take for granted more so than others. But flour isn’t easy to come by, and years ago, it wasn’t always in ready supply. If you wanted bread on your table, you might have accepted barley in place of money!

It’s hard for me to grasp that if I would have lived 100+ years ago, I could have used any old thing I have lying around my house as money. Admit it, we all have at least two of the items on this list in our possession, if not more. Things used as money in the past were items that people used as resources! Nowadays, we are able to run down the street and buy things we need in the store, rather than laboring to make them ourselves. Did you know that these things used as money in the past were once considered of high value? Please comment below if you know any other things used as money in the past!

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Lol I'd be a millionaire

YAK or some south pacific island used giant round rocks with a hole in them as money. dont remember, cannot find more about it via google search.

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